Economy

2020: vision of heaven or hell for Tipperary?

Premier County braces itself for fallout from ‘getting Brexit done’

Tipperary Star reporter

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2020: vision of heaven or hell for Tipperary?

Premier County braces itself for fallout from ‘getting Brexit done’

Tipperary is looking forward to 2020 with a mixture of fear and hope as many factors outside its influence look set to impact on the local economy.

With Brexit becoming a reality at the end of January, farming, industry and the tourism sector will be holding their collective breath as they await the fallout.

Farming is the major industry in the Premier County and Imelda Walsh, chair of North Tipperary IFA put it bluntly: “Brexit remains the most serious threat to our farmers in the history of our State. With €4.5bn of our food and drinks exports going to the UK, no other sector is as exposed.”

As Tipperary dairy farmers face into the calving season in the coming weeks, she said that it was imperative that the shipping of our calves was managed appropriately,

“The Department of Agriculture must ensure that the lairages are in place and Bord Bia must have their homework done and the markets secured,” she said.

“Tipperary beef farmers have to be paid a realistic price for their premium product,” said Ms Walsh.

There is no doubt dairy and beef will face the most serious threat, but many of the county’s international manufacturing firms could face tariffs on products they sell into the UK, depending on how the EU / UK trade talks, scheduled to start on February, 1 proceed.

On the home front, with an election looming, Tipperary will be hoping, to secure not only a Government TD, but a Cabinet place to offset any damage done by Brexit.