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Snippet from the past: Templemore in 1888

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Snippet from the past: Templemore in 1888

A run with Templemore Harries

The following appeared in the Nenagh Guardian on January 14, 1888.

Park was the trysting place fixed for Tuesday, for the above excellent pack of hounds. Sharp to time Mr. Jackson arrived with the hounds, and was met by a considerable number of horsemen. Having partaken of some of the Park hospitality, the hounds were at once got to work.

Having drawn the shrubberies around the house blank, we cantered across the church field at the back of the house, drew the fox covert, and across to Corcoran’s.

Here on the top of a furze ditch, a fine hare was started. She immediately made for the covers at Park, but scent being good, and the hounds hunting well, she was quickly rattled through the underwood, and made straight for Price’s. Here she changed course slightly to the left, and headed for Gurtahurra cross-roads, as if she meant to try Willittagha bog, but again changing her mind she crossed the road at Ryan’s house and went for the Shean at the foot of College Hill.

Hunting true and fast, the hounds pressed on and just as we came to Ralph’s, puss was viewed. The hounds being close up soon caught sight of her and racing her all through Tim Corcoran’s farm ran into her at his gate after as good a twenty minutes as any man could desire.

Being close to Park house it was agreed to lunch before trying for a hare and accordingly all made for the house. Being allowed a half an hour to partake of the good things, all made the most of their time.

On leaving, the hounds were taken up the hill towards Tubber and drew Gortbrock and Michael Egan’s farm without success. Turning towards Coffey’s, on crossing a ditch one of the horsemen jumped on to where a fine hare was lying. She doubled clean back into Coffey’s farm and down the hill towards Corish’s, into Flynn’s and turning to the left, made for Park.

The field by this had become considerably lessened, as the country over which we had come was very big, and grief abundant.
The only persons left with the hounds were Mr. Jackson, Miss Butler, Captain Bray and Sir T. Paisley.

The hare being headed at Park, turned uphill again into Gortbrock – the only place at all it was possible to ride over, on account of wire, being a very large double.

The four left in the hunt tried it valiantly, but only Miss Butler succeeded at the first attempt, Captain Bray afterwards getting over and later on the other two. However, Miss Butler slipped the field, but by diut of vigorous riding the others manage to get up as luckily the hounds got checked outside Kilduff Wood.

Too much praise cannot be given to Miss Butler for the very plucky way she pounded the field. Night coming on, home was the word.

I am sorry to say Mr. A. Smith met with an accident and also Mr. C. Oerch, but nothing been broken, I hope soon to see them out again. All were well up in the first run. I noticed Mr. Jackson (M.H.), Sir T. Paisley, Captain Bray, Mr Cooke, Mr. Smith, Mr. O’Brien, Mr. Connell, Mr. Foy and Mr. and Miss Butler.

There was a considerable number of people on wheels and on foot and all enjoyed the day very much.