Environment

Irish Water fined €2,500 over Tipperary fish kill

Cleaning substance was discharged into river

Tipperary Star reporter

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Irish Water fined €2,500 over Tipperary fish kill

Irish Water has been fined over a fish kill on the Ballycorrigan River last May

Irish Water has been fined €2,500, with €2,290 in costs, at Killaloe Court this Tuesday, following a fish kill on the Ballycorrigan River in Ballina on May 17, 2018.

Inland Fisheries Ireland prosecuted Irish Water for the discharge of a harmful substance into the river.

Among the fish mortalities were 100 brown trout of different age groups, three juvenile salmon and one stone loach which were killed when a cleaning substance was discharged into the river.

Judge Patrick Durcan heard evidence from Michael Fitzsimons, a senior fisheries environmental officer with Inland Fisheries Ireland, that following a pollution report received from the public, Inland Fisheries Ireland carried out a detailed investigation.

It found that the fish kill was caused by a combination of effluents arising from an uncontrolled maintenance event from the Irish Water Ballina / Killaloe Wastewater Treatment plant.

Irish Water entered a guilty plea.

Judge Durcan stated that Irish Water did not take into consideration the environment and conditions when discharging into the river and that Ireland’s rivers were its most important natural resource.

He said that while these resources were maintained under the vigilance of Inland Fisheries Ireland, Irish Water needed to be vigilant too. 

Amanda Mooney, director of the Shannon River Basin District with Inland Fisheries Ireland said: “Irish Water co-operated fully with Inland Fisheries Ireland’s investigation and updated its cleaning protocols for the use of chemicals in treatment plants nationwide with more appropriate methods now in use as a direct result of this incident. Our fisheries resource is an extremely valuable asset, both from a recreational and economic perspective and it is crucial that we continue to protect and conserve it for future generations to enjoy.”