SNAPSHOTS GRAND FINAL

Snapshots Grand Final - One Man and His Dog at Semple Stadium, Thurles

Voting finishes this Saturday

Brendan Maher and his dog

Brendan Maher and his dog take a break in lár na páirce in Semple Stadium on the night the floodlights were officially turned on. (See story below).

So here we have it, the six photographs which you, our website readers, have chosen for the Grand Final of Snapshots.

Over the past number of weeks we have received hundreds of nostalgic snapshots from all over County Tipperary and beyond. Those which we thought were the most appealing appeared each week in our newspapers, The Nationalist and the Tipperary Star and also online on our website, TipperaryLive.ie.

The six photographs, including the one featured above, which appear in our print editions this week have been selected by our readers in three weekly online polls on TipperaryLive.ie

Each of the six snapshots has that ‘something special’ about it, a moment frozen in time unique in its own way. However, there  can be only one winner  and again you, the reader,  will have the final say in our  online poll on TipperaryLive.ie

Until Saturday evening you will have one last chance to select the Grand Final  winner of Snapshots. All you have to do to cast your vote for your favourite Snapshot photograph is to click on the link below which takes you to our website TipperaryLive.ie

GRAND FINAL - CAST YOUR VOTE HERE

ONE MAN AND HIS DOG

This photograph (above) which was selected by our readers last week was submitted by Mike Ryan.

It was taken on the occasion of the official re-opening of Semple Stadium on February 14,  2009 and the switching on of the new floodlights. That same evening Tipperary played Cork in a National Hurling League game.

Before the teams ran out onto the field the gentleman in the photo, Brendan Ryan (Cashel, but formerly from Killoskehane, Borrisoleigh) and his dog crossed the hallowed turf to get to the other side and rested on the team bench en route.

Brendan,  who was never seen without his dog, was widely and affectionately known as ‘One man and his dog.’